Blog

Blog

Creativity Arkansas: Aj Smith

Creativity Arkansas: Aj Smith

Through drawings and prints artist Aj Smith is able to explore creative processes with freedom to experiment. Graphite pencil, silverpoint and printmaking processes provide an effective means to communicate subtle emotions and feelings where words are often inadequate. Smith’s portraits present the spirit of the soul. Smith says: 

My work, often produced in series, commemorates the lives of African Americans, past and present. A current series of drawings celebrate the ordinary person.

This Triptych: STOP, represents The Color Party of the Fifty-Seventh U.S. Colored Infantry (formerly the Fourth Arkansas Colored Infantry). Also, Bass Reeves, born a slave in Crawford County, July 1838, became a Deputy U.S. Marshal in Fort Smith, Arkansas. Frederick Douglas, an iconic figure, is well known as a former slave and abolitionist who became a congressman. Additionally, I pay tribute to the soldiers, despite a presidential order of protection, who were not treated with dignity.

His art review publications include: New York Times Weekend Arts Section, Los Angeles Times, Flash Art Magazine, international office in New York City, and Art Forum. Smith's work is represented in public and private collections throughout the United States, China and Czech Republic. A selected list of public collections include the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center; United States Library of Congress; Arkansas Arts Center Foundation Collection; Columbia Museum in South Carolina; and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. See more of Smith’s artwork at his website